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Re: OT Theology #8 The Sacrifices [message #12417 is a reply to message #12415 ] Sat, 20 January 2018 22:49 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Views of the Efficacy of the OT Sacrifices

1. Ceremonial Efficacy
It was merely Ceremonial. It was good only for ceremonial sins.

2. Temporary Efficacy
It was good only until the next sin offering. Or until the day of atonement.

3. Complete or Real Efficacy

The sin and trespass offering provided a real atonement for all sin. Moral and ceremonial. as long as the sacrifices were presented in humble faith and repentance. When the OT levitical law is consulted the effect of the sacrifice is said by God to be that it covers sin, makes atonement and forgiveness is granted.
OR
God said I will forgive him if he follows this ritual. God said it would work.
Lev. 4/35

He didn't have the book of Hebrews he just had Gods word. The humble pious regenerate Israelite with his conscience and heart burdened with sin by offering an acceptable substitute in the ritual could go home forgiven. The OT sacrifices offered temporary peace but only the sacrifice of Christ could offer permanent atonement. The OT sacrifices had an atoning efficacy ascribed to them by the law itself. There is nothing in the law to indicate to the Israelite that the sacrifices were merely types and shadows of things to come.

Re: OT Theology #8 The Sacrifices [message #12418 is a reply to message #12415 ] Sun, 21 January 2018 16:17 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Problem of the Book of Hebrews

Heb.9/8-14, 10/1-12

From the worshipers standpoint in the OT the levitical sacrifices were effective in a two fold way

1. It restored him to fellowship with God
2. the sacrifices effected the actual forgiveness for sin

The Twofold Purpose in Sacrifice

1. The revealed Purpose. The covenant relationship between God and Israel was sustained through ritual and sacrifice. He was forgiven his sin and remained in fellowship with God through it. Which means the sacrifice didn't symbolize forgiveness apart from the actual realization of it. That would rob it of its immediate meaning to the Israelite. Forgiveness was obtained through the act of sacrifice.

2. The Hidden and future purpose as revealed in the Book of Hebrews

Every sacrifice that God accepted and gave them forgiveness for was validated in the mind of the Father on the basis of what he knew he would do with the all sufficient sacrifice of his own lamb.
Heb. 10/4 It can't take away sin but then nothing in the OT says that it does. What he promised was forgiveness and restoration to covenant standing. God himself in the OT promised forgiveness.
There is an apparent contradiction to some people which is explained in the fact that the OT sacrifices were efficacious only with respect to forgiveness and not with respect to purging away sin.

The point here is that only the sacrifice of Christ could purge away sin and without that forgiveness doesn't mean anything. Rom.3/25-26

Conclusion

Through the self sufficient sacrifice of Christ for sin Gods righteousness was at last vindicated. While the OT sacrifices provided forgiveness for sins yet those sins were never purged away. (he just in his grace passed them by) They were passed over by the forbearing grace of God until purged away by the sacrifice of Christ. On account of the eternal purpose of God to punish sin and provide an atonement in his son God pardoned people in the OT. He did not actually purge sins away until covered with the blood of Christ.

Owing to the forbearance of his grace God accepted animal substitutes to cover sin and propitiate his wrath until the fullness of time and with his own lamb he would validate all the forgiveness granted through the animal sacrifice.

All of this means That Christs sacrifice was already accepted in the counsels of God and by his foreknowledge before the foundation of the world.
Rev.13/8, 1Peter 1/19-20,
Rom.3/25 i the key to all of it.

OT Theology # 9 The Vow, Nazaritism & Purifications [message #12421 is a reply to message #6441 ] Sun, 28 January 2018 11:15 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Vow

1. The Positive Vow

A promise to dedicate something to God. It can be a sacrifice or some other object. This is called Korban (corban) It means an offering not necessarily a sacrifice. Lev.1/2, Num.7/13, Neh. 10/34

Mark 7/5-13 Jesus scathing denunciation of the pharisees practice of the vow.
This was a vow of something you would give to the Lord. To get out of helping parents or someone or to get out of an obligation they would say its corban and then use it themselves.

a) Possessions
Gen.28/22 His sheep cattle possessions or servants

b) Persons
1Sam.1/11 Samuel
Judges 11/30 Jepthah vowed his daughter Bro. Freeman thought this was foolish vow that should have been repented of. He also thought it was a vow of perpetual virginhood.

c)The Vow of Devotion. this was not used in a spiritual sense. It could be called a vow of judgement. devoted to judgement.
Heb. is "Cherem" - a ban, a devoted thing
Joshua 6/17-18 Jericho. The city and everything in it. It is destroyed and burned. If it is living it is killed
Lev. 27/29

d) There are special vows devoting something to Gods use. eg. lands animals. they are then unsaleable. They become the possession of the priesthood and can never be redeemed.
Lev.27/21,28 Num.18/14,8


2. The Negative vow
A promise to renounce some act or enjoyment for the glory of God

a) Fasting
This was the most common vow of abstinence. It is commanded only on Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) Gen.37/34, Joshua 7/6, Judges 20/28, 1Sam.7/6
This vow was quite common in Israel.

b) Nazaritism You had to deny yourself. (see below)

c) Conclusion It was an expression of devotion to God. It had no necessary merit. Deut.23/22 It was an act of worship and voluntary in the OT. The vow of a of a wife or daughter was not valid unless approved by the husband or father by his silence. Num.30 Try shouting that one from the housetops in our modern society Smile

Re: OT Theology # 9 The Vow, Nazaritism & Purifications [message #12422 is a reply to message #12421 ] Sun, 28 January 2018 11:31 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Nazaritism

The Text Num.6/1f

vs 2- It can be a man or women
vs3-4- You can eat or drink nothing from the grape vine
vs 5- He can't cut his hair
vs 6- you can't touch a dead body. Even your own family

The Hebrew Term
Nazer - one who is consecrated. The word for crown is taken from this word

Two Types of Nazarite

a) a Nazarite for a definite period Num. 6
Setting oneself aside for a period to seek the Lord or do some work in ones life

b) A Nazarite from the womb. This was imposed at birth.
1 Sam.1- Samuel
Judges 13- Samson
Luke 1- John the Baptist

Requirements

a) renounce everyting fro the grape vine
b) not cut his hair
c) could touch nothing dead

The Breaking of the vow of Nazaritism
Num.6/13-21

The Meaning of the Nazarite

Num.6/2,8 It signified the consecration of the whole life unto God and separation from the things of the world. during the period of separation he was as a priest to God. He fulfilled the same requirements they did while they were serving as ministers.
Lev.10/8-9,21/10-11

The long hair signified the high priests crown because the word Nazarite is the same Heb. word for crown. The word for the high priests crown is the same word from which we get Nazarite. The same root word but different pronunciation. Separation unto God was to be taken seriously.
11 Peter 2. In the NT we are all separated unto God and priests

Just my opinion here but I think this had tremendous spiritual benefit to a pious Israelite. Setting himself apart to the Lord for a time to effect deliverance or freedom from some sin or to do a work in their life. I think Heb 5/7 is a direct reference here. Also Acts 21/23-26 Paul


[Updated on: Sun, 28 January 2018 12:41]

Re: OT Theology # 9 The Vow, Nazaritism & Purifications [message #12423 is a reply to message #12421 ] Sun, 28 January 2018 13:01 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Purifications

1. Ceremonial defilement
These were ritual uncleanness (ritual as opposed to sinful) where people had to be restored to cleanness.

a) Death It is viewed as unclean in the OT. Touching a dead body or it happening in the same house as you or touching something connected with it. Touching an unclean dead animal. If you touched a clean animal that died unnaturally you became unclean.
Num.19/13- This is the ritual that cleanses you from this. Slaying a perfect red heifer burning it and mixing its ashes with water and sprinkling you or your house or whatever became defiled by death.

Two Aspects to the Waters of Purification.

a) A clean person who touched the water or the heifer became unclean. Why? To express the infectious character of death. Its unnatural and awful. Anything pertaining to it made it unclean. Death is the ultimate expression of Gods judgement against sin.

b) The waters of purification were themselves clean and holy. Because they cleansed those who were defiled. The ashes were gathered by someone who was clean and taken to a clean place until they were needed. Then they were mixed with the water.



Re: OT Theology # 9 The Vow, Nazaritism & Purifications [message #12429 is a reply to message #12421 ] Thu, 01 February 2018 15:08 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Purification after childbirth

Lev. 12/1-8
A women was unclean after childbirth. 7 days and 33 days for a boy and 14 days and 66 days for a girl. They had to offer a burnt offering and a sin offering.
Vs 7 -"she shall be cleansed from the issue of her blood" The women was ritually unclean because of the issue of blood.

Lev. 12/7 with Lev. 15/19-28 This also included the menstrual cycle. In the OT a women couldn't come into the temple during the menstrual cycle. Only those pure and clean with no ritual defilement.

Anything unnatural relating to the private organs was not to come into the temple until clean.

Why 66 days for a girl vs 33 for a boy? Its not the fact of boy or girl but the mother in her uncleanness. A girl will also eventually add to the ritual uncleanness of the issue of blood.

Luke 2/22-24 This offering was for the mother not the child

Re: OT Theology # 9 The Vow, Nazaritism & Purifications [message #12430 is a reply to message #12421 ] Thu, 01 February 2018 15:23 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Purification from Leprosy

This was very important because of its connection to the curse. Sickness disease and death were in the curse. Leprosy was singled out because it was a type of living death. IN leprosy it is singled out because it is a graphic living description of death.

Lev.14/1-8 restores him to the nation -1st ritual
Lev.14/9-32 restores him to the temple - 2nd ritual
Lev.14/33- leprosy clinging to a house or garment

Purification from Sexual Issues

Lev. 15

Purification for a Nazarite who defiled himself

Num.6

The Lord in showing these things to Israel is showing them that the curse and sickness etc are the curse because of sin. Depicting it very graphically. The point is the OT shows that these things are unclean and defiling and you can't come into
Gods presence with them

Re: OT Theology # 9 The Vow, Nazaritism & Purifications [message #12431 is a reply to message #12421 ] Sun, 11 February 2018 10:28 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Moral defilement

1. The Trial of Jealousy

Num. 5/11-31
vs 18 with 1Cor. 11- the head covering. She now has no symbol of authority on her head. She has no protection except her own righteousness if any.
Holy Water? vs. 17 Probably water out of the Laver.
The dust in the water? vs 17 Eating dust is the mark of a curse or of deepest shame and humility. eg Gen 3/14, Ps.72/9, Micah 7/17, Isaiah 49/23
Why was the dust mixed with holy water? It signified the entrance into the innermost parts of the women of the divine curse on adultery. Some suggest this was a psychosomatic illness. It is a supernatural judgement upon this sin.

2. The deliverance of Suspicion from Blood Guiltiness.

Deut. 21/1-9 Unsolved murder! This was not an atonement or sacrifice. The priest and Levites were there only to officiate.
The purpose was not to make an atonement. There was no blood sacrifice offered by the priests. This was capital punishment. The animal was a substitute. The elders washed their hands over it so the guilt from that town was washed away.
These were added to the law because God required that even secret sins were to be dealt with if he was to dwell in the midst of Israel.

OT Theology # 10 Oaths and Taxes [message #12432 is a reply to message #6441 ] Sun, 11 February 2018 11:24 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Oath

Its Nature - In Israel it was a religious act.

The Hebrew Term
Deut. 6/13 Heb. is Shebuwah. It comes from the same root word as the sacred number 7. It implies perfection. Seven is often sacred and has religious significance and signifies completeness. The oath then implies it is seven times whatever you would say without the oath.

Kinds of Oaths

a) An assertion of a truth before the Living God
"as the Lord lives"
b) The oath of imprecation or curse.
This is an appeal to Gods penal justice against the wicked.

The Usage of the Oath

a) The Formal Oath

Gen.24/2 a promise
Gen. 21/23 to seal a covenant
Neh.6/18 an oath of friendship
Num. 5/19 an oath of innocence
Ex.22/11 an oath of purging - as in a court of law

Oaths were commanded by God to be in his name. It was to wean them from the other Gods they had learned in Egypt. The formal oath was always in the name of the Lord.

b) The Informal oath

This was not a commanded oath
11Kings 2/2 "as they soul liveth"
This was not something done carelessly or with profanity. sometimes they said "as I live". or "may the Lord do so to me"


Signs of the Oath

a) The pledge. Gen 21/27-32

b) Laying the Hand Gen.24/1-3 under the thigh of him who was sworn to. It was like shaking hands. The thigh was reverenced as the source of life. The most personal private and powerful part of the body

c) Raising the Hand to Heaven or God. Gen.14/22 swearing by the Lord

d) 1 Kings 8/31 an oath before the alter

The Sanctity of the Oath

The oath was very serious ans a religious act. to violate it required a sin offering. Even careless oaths required a sin offering to break it. Lev. 5/4, 6/3
The oath and the vow were different. sometimes they go together but they can't be confused. One would take a vow and then an oath that they would keep it.

There were new rules in the NT. Matt. 5, James 5

Re: OT Theology # 10 Oaths and Taxes [message #12436 is a reply to message #12432 ] Fri, 23 February 2018 11:29 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Theocratic Taxes

The fundamental idea is based on the fact that the people their possessions and the Holy Land belong to God and the were just his stewards. It all belonged to God and in giving a portion of it showed that they were substituting that portion for the whole. It as all Gods. The NT message is exactly the same. The Israelite in his life was constantly reminded of this as he gave of everything he had.

The First Born Male

Wether it was man or animal the first born belonged to the Lord.
Ex.13/1-2 This was not the first born but the first born "male" It may have been the 5th that was born. A man as redeemed by 5 shekels of silver. Num. 18/15-16. Instead of taking every first born male as a priest he took the whole tribe of Levi. If it was a first born animal it was given to the priest. all of this is based on the passover in Egypt Ex. 16/2, Num. 3/13, Ex 13

If it was an unclean animal (camel, rabbit) then the first born was redeemed by the priest evaluating it and you pay him the money plus 1/5 more Lev. 27/27

Clean animals had to be sacrificed. If it was without blemish. The breast and right shoulder went to the priest. You and your family ate the rest as a peace offering to the Lord. If ithe first born had a blemish he would kill it and eat it at home. Deut. 15/19-22.
Ex.13/12-13 The first born male of an ass had to be redeemed by substituting a lamb Or else you had to break its neck.
Again all this was based on the Lords Passover in Egypt. It was the first born male that the angel of Death killed and God protected with the Passover.

Re: OT Theology # 10 Oaths and Taxes [message #12437 is a reply to message #12432 ] Fri, 23 February 2018 11:34 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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First Fruits

All the fruit of the land (grain wine fruit)the first of it went to the Lord. How much? The NT principle applied here. A right heart would give plenty. This along with the sacrifices was what the priest lived on. He had to have enough.
Any food not sanctified by offering the first fruits was unclean
Re: OT Theology # 10 Oaths and Taxes [message #12438 is a reply to message #12432 ] Fri, 23 February 2018 11:43 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Tithes and Offerings

This all went to the temple and the priests

1. 1/10 of all the increase. Herds fruits wine everything. Lev.27/30-33
If he holds it back for a year because he needs it then next year he gives it and adds 1/5 to it. vs 31

2. Deuteronomic tithe
Deut. 14/22-27 It was 1/10 of the 9/10 you had left after you paid your tithe. This was the tithe you ate in religious feasts. You took it with you to the pilgrimage feast in Jerusalem 3 times a year.

3. Every third year the 10th was left at home and you had a feast of tithes where you invited strangers,levites,widows & orphans.
Deut.14/28-29
There is no agreement among scholars if this was a third 10%. some believe it is the second 10% just treated differently every third year
Re: OT Theology # 10 Oaths and Taxes [message #12439 is a reply to message #12432 ] Fri, 23 February 2018 11:54 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Tax for the service of the Sanctuary

Ex.30/16 Num. 3/12-13
It appears from 11 Chron.24/5 to be an annual tax to repair the sanctuary. Neh.10/32-33 Ex.30/12

All these taxes first fruits tithes amounted to much more than 10%

Tithing and the NT

Some say because Abraham gave a 10th then the principle of tithing is timeless. Because it came before the law. Gen.14
If true one has to give 1/10th of all your increase and not just your net pay. The Nt does not prescribe legalism in any form and it isn't even mentioned. The NT teaches it all belongs to God and we are to give to support Gods work bountifully cheerfully and regularly.
1Cor 16, 11Cor.9/6-7, Gal.6, 1Cor 9/7-14, It is always a principle in the NT.
OT Theology #11 Sacred Seasons [message #12442 is a reply to message #6441 ] Sat, 03 March 2018 20:37 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Designations of the Sacred Times and Seasons

Sabbaths
New Moons
Pilgrimage Festivals
Festivals of the Seventh Month:
- The Feast of Trumpets
- The Day of Atonement
- The Feast of Tabernacles
The Sabbatical Year
The Year of Jubilee

The Biblical Texts

Ex. 23
Lev.23-25,27
Num. 28-29
Deut. 15-16

The Significance of the Sacred Seasons

They are called the "appointed times" in the Bible. Num.28/2 The Holy days or sacred seasons were to preserve by these seasons a remembrance of Israels election and deliverance. It was also a constant reminder that God was the author of all their earthly blessings and their continual dependence on him.

Celebration of the Holy Days

All the yearly feast days were called sabbaths and no work was to be done. The feast of Tabernacles and the Passover lasted a full week. The first and seventh days of these feasts were sabbaths. On the weekly sabbath and the Day of Atonement no work could be done on the threat of death. Rest only was required. The two week long feasts one could work between the two sabbaths.
The weekly sabbath and the Day of Atonement (Shabbat Shabbatom) were called high holy days. The weekly sabbath and the sabbatical feast days were called "holy convocations". On the three sabbath feast days all males were required to go up to Jerusalem to appear before the Lord. Ex.23/14,17 Deut. 16/16. The had to bring their tithes and Deuteronomic tithes.


Re: OT Theology #11 Sacred Seasons [message #12443 is a reply to message #12442 ] Sat, 03 March 2018 21:08 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Sabbatical Seasons

1. The Weekly Sabbath


Its Origin

Gen. 2/2 God rested. The Heb word there is the root of the word for sabbath.
Ex.20/8-11 the seventh day and the seventh commandment
Gen.7/4-10, 8/10-12 References to seven day periods. He made a seven day week and then blessed 1/7 of it. There is no sabbath until we get to the law. Even the word for sabbaths isn't used in Genesis which is many centuries long.

The Sabbath in the Mosaic Period

Ex.16/21-30 This is the first mention of the sabbath.
Gen.2/3 God called the sabbath a blessing not a legalistic burden.
Mark 2/23-27 Jesus here in the OT dispensation showed his attitude toward how the sabbath was to be kept. The point is it is to be a blessing.

The Sabbath in the Post Mosaic Period

The early historians and prophets mention it.
11Kings 4/23, Amos 8/5, Hosea2/11, Isaiah 1/13, Ezek. 46/3
Many promises were made to the Jews who will faithfully observe Gods sabbath. Jer.17/21-27 Isaiah 56/2-4, 58/13, Ezek 20/12-24

The sabbath in the Post Exilic period

This is where the synagogue begins. It is not just the sabbath now but an emphasis on study as well. There was a reading of the law on various feast days. During this time the sabbath became a time for the study of the law. It was during this period that all the legalistic interpretations of the law came.
Until this time the sabbath was a blessing. Outside of Jesus claim to be messiah the one thing that aroused the religious leaders to wrath was Jesus observance of the sabbath. This happened all through the gospels. John 5/8-16. This was the one thing outside his being messiah that led to his crucifixion.


The Eschatological Sabbath

1. The cessation of the sabbath in the age of grace.
Hosea 2/11 This was part of Israels punishment. Some always have ans some still do celebrate the sabbath but God isn't recognizing it.
2. The sabbath will be reestablished during the millennium for Israel. Isaiah 66/23

[Updated on: Sat, 03 March 2018 21:29]

Re: OT Theology #11 Sacred Seasons [message #12444 is a reply to message #12442 ] Sat, 03 March 2018 21:43 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Sabbatical Seasons

2. The Sabbatical Year

Every seventh year the land was to rest (not be cultivated or farmed) and all debts were to be canceled.

Why?

a) Ex.23/ 10-11 so the poor could eat and the beasts of the field could eat

b) It was rest for the land itself. Lev.25/1-7
How were they to eat then the 7th and 8th years?
Lev.25/20-22
This isn't tos ay they couldn't make money in other ways or hunt etc. but they couldn't work as a farmer.

c) all debts were canceled every seventh year. Deut. 15/1-6
The Lords release.
Deut 15/9-10 Even a debt borrowed in the 6th year was canceled. Obedience brought blessing.

d) During the sabbatical year at the feast of tabernacles the entire law was read to everyone.

Re: OT Theology #11 Sacred Seasons [message #12445 is a reply to message #12442 ] Sat, 03 March 2018 22:28 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Sabbatical Seasons

3. The year of Jubilee


The Hebrew Term.
In the bible itis called the "Year of the Rams Horn"

Observance

7X7 sabbatical yrs then the 50th is the Jubilee
Lev. 25,27 Num.36/4
Everything was restored. All lands and people. So there was 4 yrs with no sowing or reaping

Reasons for the Jubilee year.

1/ It tended to abolish poverty. all debt was canceled and an impoverished family could start over.
2/it prevented large accumulations of wealth and poverty. One couldn't get rich off his bro.
3/ It prevented any true slavery from being established. There was much serventude but no true slavery.
4/ This year gave Israel time to do other things. Study the law, fish, hunt, raise bees etc.
5/ it preserved the tribes and families the way God intended. All property was restored.

It is interesting that one of the reasons for the exile was because this jubilee yr was never practiced in Israel. Which is odd considering some of the Godly kings they had.

OT Theology # 12 Sacred Seasons [message #12446 is a reply to message #6441 ] Sat, 10 March 2018 19:54 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Pilgrimage feasts

Passover

The term is Pesach. The Pascal Lamb or Pascal meal means the same thing. The term comes from Matt. 26/17 a Greek word out of the LXX. (Septuagint) It marks the beginning of the Jewish new year.

Ex.12, Ex.13/3-9, Ex.23/15, Lev.23/5, Num.28/16-26, Deut.16/1f

Its Purpose

1. It commemorates the deliverance of Israel from bondage in Egypt
2. It commemorates the deliverance of their first born.
3. It is the beginning of their religious new year
4. It is the starting of the Hebrew nation (as a theocracy)
5. It typifies the sacrifice of Christ.

The Passover was eaten on the 14 Nissan (a heb. month). This was called the Passover feast or feast of unleavened bread Matt 26/17
It was celebrated from the 14th - 21st of Nissan. 7 days.


Celebration of the Passover in Later Times

After the temple (or tabernacle) was built the lamb was killed at the sanctuary not at home. The blood was sprinkled upon the alter not the house. The fat was burnt on the alter. The meaning of the passover was recited each year. Ex.12/24-27. They sang the Hallel (hallelujah) Ps1/13-18. There were many public and national sacrifices offered after the lamb.
There was a second or little passover on the 2nd month 14th day for those who were unclean or on a journey. Num.9/1-12

Remarks from Jewish Historians

1. Nor ordinary food eaten after midday on 14th Nissan
2. No uncircumcised person could eat of it.
3. Between 10 & 20 people could eat it together

[Updated on: Sat, 10 March 2018 19:54]

Re: OT Theology # 12 Sacred Seasons [message #12447 is a reply to message #12446 ] Sat, 10 March 2018 20:37 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Passover

The Mode of Passover According to Josephus

  1. cup of wine
  2. blessing asked
  3. bitter herbs
  4. unleaved bread
  5. the lamb was put before the elder. then the eldest son would ask"what does this mean"
  6. The father would explain
  7. The singing of hallel
  8. eat the lamb
  9. the 3thd & 4th cups of wine
  10. the 2nd part of Hallel


Here we see Jewish tradition adding to what the bible taught.

The Passover as a Type

John 1/36 It was typical of Christ. 1 Cor 5/7 It has no other meaning aside from Christ. John 19/31-36

The Passover as a Sacrifice

The passover lamb was roasted. All other sacrifices were boiled.
It was eaten with unleavened bread which depicted the need of haste. The bitter herbs was sign of the bitterness of their bondage which showed the bitterness of death in the crucifixion. The sprinkling of the blood always in a sacrifice signifies deliverance from death. In Egypt it was over the house. In Israel it was over the alter to cover sin. It signified the covering of the believer. It was always the faith of the Israelite in doing what God said applying the blood that delivered them.

The Passover was more than a feast. It was also a sacrifice. Ex.12/27 calls it a sacrifice. The NT 11Cor. 5/7 calls it a sacrifice. It had to be slain at the temple when they had one like all the other sacrifices. The blood was sprinkled on the alter as an atonement.

What Class of Sacrifice is it?

1. It was not a sin offering. Only the priest could eat and touch the sin offering. The sin offering was cut up with some to the alter and some to the priest. The priest got the breast and thigh.

2. The Passover could belong to the class of peace offerings because like peace offerings the offerer ate it all. The Passover provides peace for us. The blood was sprinkled on the alter like the peace offering.

Re: OT Theology # 12 Sacred Seasons [message #12448 is a reply to message #12446 ] Sun, 18 March 2018 15:22 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Pentecost

Heb. Term
There is no Heb term. The Gr. term means 50th. The Heb is "feast of weeks" or "feast of 7's". It is called the feast of weeks because it occurred 7 weeks after Passover.

Observance

It is also called the "feast of harvest" The Passover opened the summer harvest and Pentecost closed it.
Ex.23/16 It is also called the feast of 1st fruits. It is a one day feast celebrated on the 6th day of Savon.
The feature of the celebration was 2 loaves made of the first fruits of the wheat harvest. No one could eat of the harvest without presenting those loaves at the alter.

Later Jewish tradition held that the nation began on the day of Pentecost.

The Meaning of the Day of Pentecost

For Israel it meant the dedication of the whole harvest to God who gave it to then in the first place. To the Jew it was intended to remind him of this fact.
For the church it had its beginnings on this day. The churches message is the Passover. But they couldn't preach it until they got the empowering.


Re: OT Theology # 12 Sacred Seasons [message #12449 is a reply to message #12446 ] Sun, 18 March 2018 15:45 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Feast of Tabernacles

Heb. Term

Feast of Tabernacles or Feast of Booths
Lev.23/34-44

Observance

This was the greatest feast of rejoicing in Israel. The Jews call it Sukkot. It was not celebrated in Israel between Joshua and Nehemiah. Neh. 8/14-18 Nehemiah reinstituted it.
This is a feast even the gentiles will celebrated in the millennium.
John 7/1-2 Jesus partook of the this feast

I don't have a lot of info in my notes on this. Here is some more. If you haven't been up to Jerusalem/Israel its a great time to go. These people put on a big conference.
https://feast.icej.org/about


Re: OT Theology # 12 Sacred Seasons [message #12450 is a reply to message #12446 ] Sun, 18 March 2018 16:05 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Day of Atonement

Introduction

Lev.16/2f They had to fast from the evening of the 9th day until the evening of the 10th day.
The atonement was for
1. the priesthood first (for themselves)
2. then for the people
3. then for the tabernacle and alter in the midst of a sinful people

On this day every priest had to take his place with the people. Only the high priest could make an atonement.

The ritual

The high priest would wash and put on holy linen garments and then offer a bullock as a sin offering for himself and his house.
He brought 2 goats out before the Lord and cast lots. One goat sacrificed for the sin offering for the nation and the other for Azazel
All the priest except the high priest were out with people. No one was in the temple/tabernacle vs 17
The high priest would take the blood and sprinkle it 7 times before the mercy seat.
The live goat was for Azazel. 16/7-10,20-22

Re: OT Theology # 12 Sacred Seasons [message #12451 is a reply to message #12446 ] Sun, 18 March 2018 16:35 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Goat for Azazel

Text

Lev. 16/7-10,20-22

Interpretations (4 views)

1. It is a place

a) A lonely place in the wilderness where it was banished
b) Azazel was a mountain the goat was thrown off. If this was true then in their constant wanderings they would have left the mountain behind as it was a big desert.

2. It was a person.

The language in vs 8 suggests a person. It is a personal name.

a) It is the devil. The sins were being sent back to the prince of this kingdom who by them had hoped to enslave Israel.
b) It is a demon. An evil spirit who lived in the wilderness and sending the goat to him was the means of renouncing the kingdom of darkness.

Objections
a) Azazel occurs nowhere else in the bible. If he was this important a person to divide the sin offering with Lord surely his name would be elsewhere.
Seventh Day Adventists say one goat was Christ and one goat was Satan. They day the atonement is not yet finished as Satan has to bear away our iniquities. John 1/36
b) Both goats are presented to the Lord so both make an atonement.

3. It is simply an abstract noun meaning complete removal. The term is from the verb Azel which does not occur in Heb but does in Arabic which is a sister language. The Arabic verb means to remove or entire removal.
The term Azel is a reduplicated form of the Azel. It is pronounced twice to indicate intensity. Azel Azel or Azazel to show complete removal.

4. Azazel means the goat himself. The word itself is reduplicated and shows intensity but rather than being an abstract noun meaning removal it is a noun of agent and refers to the goat itself.
This is also Bro Freemans Opinion. That Azazel means the goat itself. Josephus believed it this way as well as Luther. The Latin Vulgate presented it this way. The KJV translators translated Azazel as scapegoat
There was 2 goats. One for yahveh and one for a remover. One goat provided a covering for sin and the other a removing of the sin forever. It is physically impossible to depict both ideas in one goat.
Isaiah 53 He bore away our sins and sickness

OT Theology # 13 Judaism [message #12454 is a reply to message #6441 ] Sat, 14 April 2018 20:32 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Origin and Meaning of the Term "Judaism

The reason why we study this is because one can't understand much in the NT without understanding between the testaments. There is much in the NT that just appears without explanation. eg: synagogue, pharisees, Sanhedrin

The term "Judaism" occurs in 11 Maccabees 2/21,14/38. During this period (between the testaments) Judaism refers to the religion of the Jews as contrasted to Greek Hellenism.

The term in the NT is used to contrast non-christian Jewish religion with Christianity. Gal.1/13 Jews religion. The greek word is Judaism. Titus 1/14 Jewish fables. Gal 2/14 jewish customs

There is no word in the OT that can be translated "Jew" There is a word that is a persons name. "Yehudi" it means jewish or jew. A noun or adjective.
11 Kings 16/6, Ester 5/13, Neh. 1/2
The term comes from the kingdom of Judah. Jew or Judaism. Jew was originally a Judite from the kingdom of Judah. After the exile the name Yehudi began to applied to anyone who was a jew anywhere.

There is a difference between legalistic Judaism and classical Judaism. The point being that there is nothing wrong with Ezra and Nehemiah calling the people back to mosaic worship. This legalistic Judaism arose between the testaments after prophecy had ceased and there was no king and Israel was ruled mostly by priestly families.

Re: OT Theology # 13 Judaism [message #12456 is a reply to message #12454 ] Sat, 14 April 2018 20:56 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Background to Post-Exilic Judaism

The Political Background

1. The biblical period - under Ezra and Nehemiah

a) The Babylonian period 586-536 BC
b) The Persian period. 536-400 BC

536 BC the Persians allow the Jews to return to Israel
Ezra 3/1-7 Burnt offering is restored
535 BC the foundation of the temple is laid. Ezra 3/8-13
Ezra 4 for 15 yrs no more work is done
520 BC the work resumes under Haggai and Zechariah
515 BC the temple is finished
478 BC Esther becomes queen
458 BC Ezra comes as a teacher/priest Ezra 7-10
445 BC Nehemiah comes a governor and begins to rebuild the city
Neh. 1-7
433 BC Nehemiah goes back to Babylon Neh. 13/6
432 BC Malachi preaches
425 BC Nehemiah returns and initiates reforms

It is during this period the Jews have returned rebuilt their temple and resumed their sacrifices.

[Updated on: Sat, 14 April 2018 20:57]

Re: OT Theology # 13 Judaism [message #12457 is a reply to message #12454 ] Sat, 14 April 2018 21:10 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Political Background

2. The Inter biblical Period

a) The Persian Period 400-333 BC
b) The Greek Period 333-167 BC
- Macedonian Supremacy (Alexander the Great)333-320 BC
- The Ptolemaic Supremacy (Egypt) 320-198 BC
- The Seleucid Supremacy (Syria) 198-167 BC This was Anticanis 4th. He was the worst oppressor of the Jews until Hitler arose. He ruled over Egypt Syria Palestine after Alexanders Kingdom broke up. He tried to Hellenize the Jews.
c) The Maccabean Period 167-37 BC
63 BC Pompey (Roman) took Palestine
37 BC Herod the Great begins to rule. Appointed by the Romans

[Updated on: Sat, 28 April 2018 21:32]

Re: OT Theology # 13 Judaism [message #12459 is a reply to message #12454 ] Tue, 08 May 2018 11:07 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The religious Background The rise of the Jewish sects and the development of legalistic Judaism

The Maccabean revolt

They were originally called Hasmoneans named after a priestly family from Modim in Judea. They were faithful to the Lord and the law of Moses. Antiochus required the Jews to follow Greek culture.
Matthias (a priest) refused. See 1 Maccabeas 2f (apocrypha)
This is the origin of Hanukah.
In 165 BC Judas Maccabees recaptured Jerusalem and rededicated the the alter and the temple and Hanukah celebrates this.
1 Maccabeas 4/38-61, 11 Maccabeas 10/6-7
The feast of dedication or Hanukah is celebrated in Dec. It is also called the feast of lights because of the use of lights in the homes and synagogues. In Israel today the emphasis is on the patriotic aspect of Hanukah.
Re: OT Theology # 13 Judaism [message #12460 is a reply to message #12454 ] Tue, 08 May 2018 11:22 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Jewish Sects

Hasideans or Hasidim

This was a Jewish sect before Christ. The name comes from the word Hasid which means pious. This name "the pious ones" was given to the orthodox Jews who opposed the Hellenization of Palestine.
1 Mac2/42,7/13
They still exist today in Israel and elsewhere. Their origin is uncertain but they existed as a religious group before the Maccabeas. They might have arose after Alexanders conquest by withdrawing from the world
1 Mac. 1/63, 11 mac.6/18f, Judith 12/2 Josephus book 14 4/3 (apocrypha)
These were active supporters of the maccabeans religiously but had little interest in politics and later separated totally when maccabean interest became more political.

The Essenes or pious ones

They inhabited the Qumran community. Their origin is uncertain but it is believed they came from the Hassadim and fled to the wilderness during antiochus persecutions because they refused to fight with the maccabeas.
They were a monastic brotherhood devoted to the ascetic life. Self supporting, zealous for the law, copied the scriptures
They did not go up to the temple to worship.
Some try to relate Jesus and John Baptist to this group. But Jesus ate with sinners worshiped a the temple and drank wine. All things the essenes wouldn't do.

Re: OT Theology # 13 Judaism [message #12461 is a reply to message #12454 ] Tue, 08 May 2018 12:45 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Pharisees

The term
Is from a Heb verb that means to separate or make distinct

Their Origin
It is believed they are the successors of the Hasidim when they became more political. The religious ones then changed their name. Josephus book 13 10/5

The beginning of Legalistic Judaism

The Pharisees as successors of the Hasadim were very zealous for the law unlike most Jews. They took vows in the most strict manner to observe ceremonial ritual and purity. The party was called a brotherhood in addition to being called pharisees. They wouldn't buy or sell to an unclean person. ie one who didn't keep ritual law. They separated themselves from the common people. John 7/49

They included in their observance of Moses law the oral law and required everyone else to do it too. They interpreted the law and made strict obedience to the letter of the law and divided phrases and sentences and words with ridiculous meanings.


There were two schools of pharisees.

1/ The Hilail school - he founded a school with a rigid strict dissecting of the word
2/ The Shammai school - A rival of the Hilail. He was an extreme formalist and founded a school of legalistic Judaism which totally ignored the spirit of the law.

By the time of Jesus these two schools had along with all the oral interpretation completely superseded the scriptures.

The Talmud lists 7 different kinds of pharisees.

1/ The shoulder pharisee - He parades his good deeds like a badge on his shoulder
2/ The wait a bit pharisee - He begs for time so he can perform another good deed.
3/ The bleeding pharisee - He is so pious that when he sees a women he would close his eyes and end up running into a wall and bleeding. He would rather bleed than sin
4/ The painted pharisee - He advertises his holiness so no one will touch him and defile his holiness
5/ The reckoning pharisee - He always says . . . what good deeds have I to do to balance the bad I've done
6/ The fearing pharisee - He serves God because he fears not to.
7/ The pharisee of love - He serves God because he loves God

This is the Talmuds recognition of their own legalism. They were saying a true pharisee is one who loves God

The Talmud was a collection of writings about the interpretation of the law in the Torah. The Torah is the Heb bible or OT. Jesus called the Talmud the Traditions of the Elders and said they made the scriptures of no effect.

Re: OT Theology # 13 Judaism [message #12462 is a reply to message #12454 ] Tue, 08 May 2018 13:14 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Sadducees

According to Josephus they arose at the same time as the Pharisees. It comes from a plural Heb word "to be righteous" By the time of Jesus the Sadducees had gained control of the temple with its worship and the pharisees controlled the synagogues with their worship.

The high priest was always a Sadducee. Compared to the pharisees they were fewer in number. The party was made up of nobles priests levites and the high priestly family.

The pharisees were not priests but they did include any who could meet the requirements. The Sadducee took only the Pentateuch as scripture and denied basic doctrines.
eg resurrection, angels spirits Luke 20/27, Acts 23/8 Mark 12/18

The Scribes

The term
means to write.

Its Origin

All the law had to be copied by hand. They were called Sophorim in the OT. The word means book or writing. It is translated in the OT as scribe, secretary, enumerator. They appeared as a professional class of learned men in Jer.36, 11 Sam.8/17, Ezra 7/6
Jesus didn't rebuke all scribes Matt23/34. They generally came from the priestly clans In the NT they were usually ordinary people who wrote and taught the word. Educated but not priests.

In Matt.22/35 they are called students of the law or lawyers. Luke7/30, 10/25,5/17, Acts 5/34, doctors of the law and also called rabbi. They became prominent with the pharisees between the testaments.

Re: OT Theology # 13 Judaism [message #12463 is a reply to message #12454 ] Wed, 09 May 2018 12:49 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Zealots

They were the extreme nationalists who were the successors to the Maccabees. They arose after Rome took Palestine in 63 BC. They opposed Roman rule paid no taxes and gave no allegiance to any king but God.

One of Jesus disciples was a zealot. Luke 6/15, Acts 1/13
They are very important in history because they led the revolt in 70 AD which Jesus predicted in Matt.24

The Sanhedrin

This was the Jewish supreme court. Jewish tradition places its origin in Moses selecting 70 elders to help him rule. According to this tradition Ezra reorganized it after the exile.
Other sources say the high priest and elders having much authority under Rome formed it after a group that preceded it during the Maccabees period. (this is Bro Freemans opinion)
As far as a pattern is concerned 11Chron. 19/5-11 could be the origin.

The Sanhedrin exercised some civil but mostly religious authority. They had their own police who could make arrests.
Matt.26.47, Acts 4/3, 5/17, 9/2 Mark 14/43

Re: OT Theology # 5- The Tabernacle [message #12465 is a reply to message #12347 ] Wed, 09 May 2018 12:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Ritualism

OT rituals are the pattern of spiritual reality. The NT teachings assumes one understands the OT symbolism and shadows of things to come. Rituals are outward signs of inward truths.
Heb. 9/1-12, Heb. 10/11,18-19

The covenant relationship between God and Israel was expressed in ritual worship. The aim of the covenant was to express in a graphic manner the need of cleansing from sin and holiness before God. The mosaic ritual was a visible conscious symbol of this truth. However the ritual was not simply a system of outward signs of internal truths. From the standpoint of the law it was the necessary vehicle for the actual realization of obtaining forgiveness and having fellowship with God. For example sacrifice did not symbolize forgiveness of sins and the propitiation of Gods wrath apart from the actual realization of these two effects. It was not merely a symbol
Re: OT Theology # 5- The Tabernacle [message #12466 is a reply to message #12347 ] Wed, 09 May 2018 12:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Place of the scriptures in the Public worship

It seems to be subordinate to the ritual in the OT. The proclamation of the word in public worship does not appear as the principle thing in OT worship.

The liturgical churches identify with the OT not the NT and the alter is still central. The pulpit emphasizes the word. The alter emphasizes the mass etc. Is the alter central and the pulpit off to the side? In the liturgical churches it is.

We don't know how they did it but the word was to be taught by the priests. There is no mention of services in the OT to teach the word. Deut.33/10
Deut 31/10-11 The only public reading of the law was every seven yrs at the the feast of tabernacles. This was not negative because the parents were commissioned by God to teach their children.
Deut 6/1-7 They weren't stressing the word in their services because they were living it day by day. They were teaching their children day in and day out.

In the exile (586 BC) the synagogue appears. They no longer had a place to offer sacrifice and no more temple. The more pious people and priests got together and started a synagogue and a service. Ezekiel started services in his home. When Ezra got to Israel he built a pulpit out of wood.
Re: OT Theology # 5- The Tabernacle [message #12467 is a reply to message #12347 ] Wed, 09 May 2018 12:54 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Place of Worship

The Patriarchal Period

God was very concerned about where they worshiped because the heathen did it everywhere. The places of worship were where the patriarchs set up an alter. That was often where God appeared to them. Gen. 12/7
Whenever they went back that way they would worship there. Sometimes they built an alter where they were moved by the Spirit to call upon the Lord. Gen.12/8
Gen.8/20 the 1st alter. It is implied in Gen.4/4 the sacrifice of Abel. A blood sacrifice. It was forbidden to sacrifice on the ground. They had to do it on an alter.The name for alter is taken from the word for sacrifice. In this early period it wasn't like us today or the sabbath in Israel. The patriarch was the priest of his house.

The Mosaic Period

God was very specific about where they could worship. It could only be the place where God designated.
Deut. 12/2-15
vs 13-14 They could sacrifice only where God told them to.
The sanctuary was for two reasons:
a) to keep the people from idolatry
b) to keep the people in theocratic unity. A theocracy.


The problem of Deut. 12 & Ex.20

Ex.20/24, Deut.12/2-15 This was given during the exodus wanderings. They moved around a lot and when they did they would put up the Tabernacle and build an alter. Deut. was the law. God was going to establish a temple and only there could they sacrifice.

The Locations of the Tabernacle

It was portable and could be moved at will. During the conquest of Canaan it was at Gilgal. Joshua 4/19. Then moved to Ebal Joshua 8/30-35. The tabernacle which is a type of the later temple was portable but wherever it was the people had to bring their sacrifices there.
After the conquest it was set up at Shiloh and stayed there during the Judges. During Samuels time it was moved to Nob. During Davids reign it was at Gibeon. Solomon built the temple at Jerusalem.




Re: OT Theology # 5- The Tabernacle [message #12468 is a reply to message #12347 ] Wed, 09 May 2018 12:55 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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General Description of the Tabernacle

The mosaic sanctuary was a tent called the tent of meeting (the meeting of God with his people). It was sometimes called the tent of testimony.
The outer court was 150' long X 75' wide.They all couldn't get in there to hear the word so the ritual was emphasized. They taught the word in other ways.
The tabernacle itself was 45' long X 15' wide X15' high. It was made of boards covered with curtains with door facing east. The actual tabernacle was covered with goats hair cloth and then covered with two other sets of curtains.
The tabernacle had two rooms. The holy place was 30' long X 15' wide X 15' high leaving the Holy of Holies a perfect cube(15 x 15 x 15) signifying perfection.
Re: OT Theology # 5- The Tabernacle [message #12469 is a reply to message #12347 ] Wed, 09 May 2018 12:57 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Arrangement of the Tabernacle

a) The Alter of Burnt Offering

7.5' wide X 4.5'high. This was an alter made of acacia wood covered with bronze so it would withstand the heat. The inside was stone and in the exodus it was earth. There were steps up to the alter but the priests could not use them. He had to use an incline so that his robes wouldn't flutter and his nakedness shown. He had to be ultra modest in his approach to God.

b) The Laver

A big bronze or copper bowl. The priests had to wash their hands and feet before they ministered at the alter or the holy place.

c) Table of Showbread

3' long X 1.5' wide X 2.25' high. In Hebrew it is called the table of his presence. Num. 4/7 There were 12 loaves on it and only the priests could eat it. Except as David in case of human need. 1 Sam.21

d) The Golden Lampstand

A lampholder with 7 branches signifying perfection. There were 7 bowls on top shaped like almonds holding oil which burned continually with pure olive oil.

e) The alter of Incense.

This was made of acacia wood covered with pure gold. 3' high and 1.5' square. It was sometimes called the golden alter. It was set right before the veil which hid Gods presence.

f) The Ark of the Covenant or Ark of the Testimony

The top of the ark was a solid gold plate called in KJV the mercy seat. The Heb. is the propitiatory. Upon it were two golden cherubim with their wings outstretched over the ark with their wings touching each other. 3.75' long x 2.25'wide x 2.25'high
Poles for bearing the ark stayed in the rings on the ark.No one even the high priest could touch the ark. When the high priest went in once a year he had to put a big laver of incense in first so he couldn't see it. It had to be covered prior to moving it.

The Veil

It was made of the finest linen and covered with cherubim to hide the holy of holies from everyone.


The Ark

https://s3.amazonaws.com/plugpolo/poloup/up/a/a25/a25683bebc c84190af8603a9ffd95bfb/img1.jpg

The tabernacle

https://carm.org/images/tabernaclelayout.jpg

Re: OT Theology # 5- The Tabernacle [message #12470 is a reply to message #12347 ] Wed, 09 May 2018 12:58 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Meaning and Symbolism of the Sanctuary

The Three Divisions

a) The Outer Court. Only the covenant people could enter here. No gentiles allowed. This points to only Christians being able to enter the kingdom.

b) The Holy Place. It was veiled and lighted but only the anointed priesthood could enter in. This points to Jesus as our high priest.

c) The Holy of Holies. It was veiled and in darkness. Only the high priest and then only once a year.

The Basic and Deeper Spiritual Meaning of the Tabernacle

The tabernacle (lit. the tent of meeting) God literally dwelt here in the midst of his people.

By virtue of the fact that there was a veil between him and the people and only the priesthood could minister for him and for the people then the people were made conscious that though he condescended to dwell with in their midst yet because of their sinfulness this communion could not be realized directly but only through the consecrated priesthood.

Lest the priesthood forget that they were only symbolically holy they were limited to the holy place and could not enter the holy of holies. The 3 divisions emphasized the division between a holy God and a sinful people who needed a mediator.

But the significance is that God condescended to dwell among them and instituted the ritual that held out the hope of one dy a permanent way would be made into his presence. It testified to the possibility of sinners approach to God in a more meaningful way. The more pious Israelite could put things together and understand a lot.
eg. john the Baptist - there goes the lamb of God . . . John 1/29
Abraham saw my day . . . John 8/56

Re: OT Theology # 5- The Tabernacle [message #12471 is a reply to message #12347 ] Wed, 09 May 2018 13:00 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The sacred Furnishings

1. The great Alter

This alone was available to the congregation. Here was where he had communion with God. If he didn't come by way of the alter he wasn't accepted by God. He could only come by faith and by way of a blood sacrifice.

The Laver

This is where the priest washed his hands and feet and signified that he who carried out the ministry of reconciliation had to sanctify his own life first. Jesus most scathing denunciations were of the religious leaders for their failure to do this.

Alter Of Incense

This burned perpetually day and night and signified the prayers of the priests as they ministered for the people as intercessors.
Num. 14/46 He didn't pray he just grabbed fire off the alter and incense.

Table of Showbread

12 loaves representing the 12 tribes of Israel. The Heb. is the table of presence and signified that God was present among his people to provide for them.

Golden Lampstand

A light which signifies the pure light of revelation which only Israel had. It had 7 branches with 7 bowls on top shaped like almonds holding oil which burned continually with pure olive oil.
Psalm 147/19-20

- seven is the number of perfection
- seven days then the sabbath
- seven years then the sabbatical
- Evey seven times seven years then the year of Jubilee
- the Feast of Tabernacles seven days long
- the Passover - seven days long
- seven weeks from Passover to Pentecost
- seven lambs offered at Pentecost

The Ark of the Covenant

This was in the Holy of Holies and signified the throne for Israels king and his presence among his people. He was literally enthroned there. Lev.16/2, Ex.29/42-46
The significance of the Ark is that inside were the two tablets of stone. God sits enthroned in Israel on the basis of the law covenant he made with them. He sits on the law. It was a continual testimony of the need to keep the law. But the mercy seat covers the broken law which the Israelites broke and needed forgiveness for. The blood was sprinkled on it. The blood which God provided by his grace covered over the sin and broken law. There is the meeting place - grace and atonement.
Re: OT Theology # 5- The Tabernacle [message #12472 is a reply to message #12347 ] Wed, 09 May 2018 13:01 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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The Deeper Spiritual Understanding of the Tabernacle

There are three realms of the christian experience . . .

a) Eph.1/4-12 refers to the outer court - the salvation experience.
b) Eph.1/13-14 the holy place - baptism of the HS
c) Eph. 3/19,4/13 The holy of holies - the fullness of God

Any christian can enter into the presence of God (with or without the Baptism of the HS) by the Blood of Jesus. Its one thing to have access its another entirely to abide there.

a) The outer court suggests the kingdom realm. All the Israelites could enter here. They had to come to the alter to get forgiveness. Like salvation all can come here. Eph.1/4-12

b) The holy place suggests the spiritual realm. This is the place of anointing and ministry. Refers to the HS Baptism. Without an anointing (oil) no priest could enter here. Eph.1 13-14

c) The holy of holies suggests the realm of the spirit. The place of the presence of God. The place of anointed ministry. The place of the fullness of God. Eph. 3/19, 4/13

a) To be born of the spirit gives us life in the kingdom realm.
b) Being baptized by the Spirit gives us anointing and power in the ministry realm
c) Being perfected by God is the holy of holies. The fullness of God.

It is one thing to have access to Gods presence but another to abide there. Ps. 91 speaks of abiding there. Its not Gods will to stop with salvation or the HS baptism experience but to pick up the cross and follow Jesus as Pauls prayer in Eph. 3 says. Faith in Christ gives us the right of access. The crucified life gives us the right of abiding.
- John 15/7 not all are abiding in Christ
- Ps. 91/1 You have to abiding to get the promises
- Rev. 7/9-10 The saved can stand before his throne
- Rev. 3/21 O/C's can sit on his throne with him
- Rev. 2/26-27 O/C's rule and reign with him. O/C's have picked up the cross and moved on.
- Ps. 103/7 His ways to Moses and his acts to Israel

Christ in the Tabernacle

One can draw a line from the ark to alter through the laver and the alter of incense. Then another line from the lampstand to the table. You can see the cross right in the tabernacle.
Phil. 2 Jesus the king came fro the fullness of God down to us and then after his work was finished he went back to the fullness of God. Our call is to follow him by taking up the cross.

a) the holy of holies Col.1/19, Phil.2/1-8
b) the lampstand John 1/1-9, 8/12 In 1/7-9 the word Light is capitalized. Jesus was the light of the world.
c) the table of showbread. He offered himself s the bread of life. John6/26-36, 48
d) He is the laver in the outer court. Symbolic of cleansing. He is the water of life. John4/10,13-4
e) the great alter of sacrifice. John 1/29
f) the alter of incense Heb.7/25 He functions as our intercessor as the priests did ministering in the tabernacle.
g) Jesus went to the Father- back to the fullness of God.Phil. 2/9-11
Everything in the tabernacle points to him and speaks of him. Either his person or his work.

The alter is John 3/16 and most stay here. The laver speaks of water baptism Matt.28 with Acts 2/38 The holy place is the call to come deeper into the HS baptism and evidenced by tongues the alter of incense. Most also begin to receive revelation and understanding - the lanmpstand. The revelation concerns the purpose for salvation and HS Baptism not to sit down and hold a praise service. Receiving these things will give us an appetite for our diet. The bread of life or the talbe of his presence. 1 Peter 2/2. The HS Baptism and the word will bring you into the fullness of God.

Everything in the tabernacle even the type of sacrifice pointed to Jesus. This doesn't mean you can take every board and utensil and get some spiritual significance out of it
Re: OT Theology # 13 Judaism [message #12473 is a reply to message #12454 ] Thu, 10 May 2018 11:13 Go to previous messageGo to previous message
Mark L  is currently offline Mark L
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Registered: October 2006
Location: Canada
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The Synagogue

It is a greek word that means "the people"

Background

Before the tabernacle and temple there were sacred places where Abraham and others worshiped. Under Moses they had the tabernacle. In Palestine between Joshua and David it was placed in shilo. Solomon built his temple in Jerusalem. All through this time the people sacrificed on the high places to many gods.

The Beginnings of the Synagogue

During the exile they were without a temple and sacrifices and they knew better than to build one in Babylon. They went to Babylon without a synagogue and came back to Israel with one. Jewish tradition says while in Babylon they gradually began to meet on the sabbath and festival days. They did this in priests or prophets homes. Sung the psalms shared from the scriptures. Because pious Jews wanted something and didn't have anything else.
Ezek.8/1,20/1 Here we see the beginnings of the synagogue.

Why did the Synagogue continue after the temple was rebuilt

1/ Because it had become a vital part of the Jewish way of life in the exile
2/ It helped preserve Jewish worship and religious solidarity
3/ As it still is today it became not just for spiritual worship but also social gatherings
4/ From the beginning it was a place to go study the word and study of it became prominent. This was according to Gods plan because Jesus patterned the church after it.

Functions of the synagogue

One could be established anywhere 10 Jewish males gathered.
The head was called the ruler and he presided over the service. Mark 5/22

4 functions
1/worship
2/instruction in the word for adults and children. There were also synagogue schools for for males age 6-16.
3/It was a social center,community life, and a place for legal transactions
4/It was also a place of trial and punishment

The Services

They were held on Shabbat morning.

Recite the Shema (Deut. 6/4-9)
Blessings from the word were pronounced
A cycle of 18 prayers were recited
Readings from the law and prophets
Teaching preaching and instruction
A benediction from the ruler

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